Saturday, October 14, 2023

There's just so much Weird and Awkward in this Otezla Commercial

 


Ok, so the gawky weird guy is getting out of the Uber in front of the movie theater to start a blind date with Tara, aged 33 years.  I'd assume that Tara didn't get a picture of Ned because otherwise she would have noped right out of there- I mean, come on, he's nowhere near good looking enough to be with this woman- but she recognizes him, so I guess she's all in.  Desperation is a strange thing....

Ned (of course his name is Ned.  Jeeeeeeshhh....)  is instantly concerned about his plaque psoriasis (I can't believe it only took me three tries to get the spelling right) which brings me to the question I ask every single time I see one of these ads- why do people self-conscious about red splotches on their arms and legs wear less clothing than most beach-goers?  It's like they WANT to feel uncomfortable.  Just wear a long-sleeved shirt, you dope- it's an evening date, it's taking place almost entirely in an air-conditioned theater, I mean, what the hell?

I'd love to know what's happening on the screen when Ned and Tara react so violently that popcorn flies up (but not out) from Ned's bucket and soda flies up (but not out) of Tara's cup.  I'd think it must be happening during the opening credits or even during the coming attractions because it doesn't look like they've consumed any of their snacks at all but that doesn't make any sense because we also see a guy already fast asleep.  Judging from the look on Tara's face, it's a positive moment in the film, plus we see a little kid for whom the scene has no impact at all.  Why do we see these other people anyway?  What do they add to the story?

When the film is over, Ned and Tara exit the theater and Ned gives Tara the most stilted, awkward hug I've ever seen- the five percent chance he had of ever hearing from Tara again vanished with that hug, I guarantee it.  I'm an expert on dating, you know.  

Is this a new trend in dating- you just meet someone outside of a movie theater, sit next to them during a film, and then say goodbye when the film is over and go your separate ways?   Who pays for the tickets and snacks in this arrangement?  What's in it other than avoiding the "shame" of going to the movies by yourself?  Other than running the risk of being seen sitting next to Ned- and getting that wooden hug at the end- this seems like a pretty sweet deal for Tara if Ned is my Boomer idea of a gentleman who paid for everything.  

Oh yeah, this commercial is for some drug that clears your skin, I guess.  I mean, who cares?  I want to know if Ned is Blocked before he gets home in his second Uber ride of the night, or just Ghosted.  See how I know the cool terms?  I'm hip to the current lingo, man. 


8 comments:

  1. Bonus points for casting "smart black girl" with "dopey awkward beta male"

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    1. Twice as many for realizing that the "beta" or "alpha" idea isn't real. Not even in wolves, so find another way to feel superior.

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    2. Twice as many points for realizing that the "alpha/beta" idea is all false, even with wolves. You'll have to find another way to feel superior.

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  2. Was hoping the white haired lady was a retired character actress. Rhea Perlman perhaps.

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    1. I’m convinced the old woman is June Hudson, former costume designer for Doctor Who and Blake’s 7. If not she’s intentionally dressed up as June Hudson.

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  3. The way I see this commercial, the old WHITE women represents a disease, Ned's plaque psoriasis, she's hanging on to him, attached. Commercial tells the new miracle drug clears that up. So at the end the old WHITE leaves, signifying the disease is gone. More programming for the WHITE haters

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  4. I thought Ned was actually kinda cute. Never thought for one moment that she was desperate. I remember when I first started dating my huband, people often would tell him that he could do 'better' and that he felt 'sorry' for me. Jokes on you judgemental folks, still together 20-years later and love each other to death.

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  5. What I want to know is how it is that the elderly lady keeps changing her "costume" in all of her scenes. In the opener she's wearing a red jacket with a multi-colored print blouse. In the audience seated about three rows back from Ned and Tara, she appears to be wearing a royal blue jacket. Then during the exit from the theater, she's wearing a black jacket with red slacks and a different multi-colored blouse. How did she manage this??? What gives here???

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